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Berkeley Big Bang 08

New Media Symposium and Art Festival

Berkeley Big Bang 08 was three days of new media and art hosted by BAM/PFA and the Berkeley Center for New Media, timed to link with 01SJ: A Global Festival of Art on the Edge, a new media art biennial taking place June 4–8, 2008 in San Jose. Occurring together for the first time, these two events combined to create one of the nation’s largest gatherings of new media art, a virtual “big bang” of innovation and creativity.

The Berkeley Big Bang program included a two-day symposium on new media, art, science, and the body in partnership with Berkeley Center for New Media and Leonardo: The International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology; a campus media lab demonstration and open house; and an alternate reality game. Berkeley Big Bang was presented in tandem with BAM/PFA exhibitions of work by media artists Trevor Paglen, Jim Campbell, Lynn Hershman Leeson, and Scott Snibbe.


Embodiment: The Body and New Media
June 2, 2008; yyyy 8 Minutes; Video
Welcome and introductions by Richard Rinehart, Digital Media Director and Adjunct Curator, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

The first of a two-part symposium, co-hosted by the Berkeley Art Museum and the Berkeley Center for New Media.
Embodiment: The Body and New Media
June 2, 2008; yyyy 15 Minutes; Video
Welcome and introductions by Ken Goldberg, Director, Berkeley Center for New Media and Professor, College of Engineering and School of Information, UC Berkeley

The first of a two-part symposium, co-hosted by the Berkeley Art Museum and the Berkeley Center for New Media.
Virtual Embodiment and Myths of Meaning in Second Life: Hubert Dreyfus
June 2, 2008; yyyy 41 Minutes; Video
Keynote by Hubert Dreyfus, Professor of Philosophy, UC Berkeley

Second Life is a popular networked 3-D virtual environment where millions of online visitors control avatars that interact with each other, build structures, visit shops, and engage in a variety of social and economic activities. Dreyfus analyzes Second Life from a philosophical perspective, exploring how thinkers such as Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, and Heidegger would respond to the virtual embodiment enabled by such systems. Dreyfus argues that the explicit conscious indirectness inherent in how responses and emotions are conveyed in Second Life is distinctly Cartesian, dualistic, and fundamentally limited. Drawing from Existential Phenomenology, Dreyfus suggests that maximally meaningful human experiences require an intuitive shared sense of vulnerability, mood, and emotion that is currently lacking but may be possible with future technological advances that would directly link the bodies or brains of the participants in Second Life with their avatar bodies in the virtual world.
Plenary Talk: Philip Rosedale
June 2, 2008; yyyy 30 Minutes; Video
Philip Rosedale, Founder and Chairman of the Board, Linden Lab
Introduced by Jane Metcalfe, Co-Founder of
Wired Magazine and BAM/PFA Board Member

Philip Rosedale founded San Francisco-based Linden Lab in 1999, and has led the creation of the virtual world of Second Life from initial concept to a market-leading virtual world, with a robust economy and a global population. As a pioneer in the virtual world industry, Rosedale is actively involved in the strategy, development, and design of Linden Lab’s products, including the world of Second Life and the Second Life Grid platform. Rosedale holds a B.S. degree in Physics from the University of California at San Diego.
Plenary Talk: Panel
June 2, 2008; yyyy 30 Minutes; Video
Hubert Dreyfus, Professor of Philosophy, UC Berkeley
Philip Rosedale, Founder and Chairman of the Board, Linden Lab
A Body of Film: Kris Fallon
June 2, 2008; yyyy 12 Minutes; Video
Kris Fallon, Graduate Student, Rhetoric, Film Studies, and New Media, UC Berkeley

Berkeley graduate students present the latest research on networked embodiment and digital multitudes in film and discuss how Jim Campbell’s Home Movies require embodied participation.
A Body of Film: Brooke Belisle
June 2, 2008; yyyy 18 Minutes; Video
Brooke Belisle, Graduate Student, Rhetoric, Film Studies, and New Media, UC Berkeley

Berkeley graduate students present the latest research on networked embodiment and digital multitudes in film and discuss how Jim Campbell’s Home Movies require embodied participation.

Black Cloud / Red Eye: Greg Niemeyer
June 2, 2008; yyyy 10 Minutes; Video
Greg Niemeyer, Artist and Professor, Art Practice, UC Berkeley

Artist Greg Niemeyer prepares symposium attendees for playing the immersive game Black Cloud / Red Eye.
Sensors and Sensibilities: Eric Paulos
June 2, 2008; yyyy 20 Minutes; Video
Eric Paulos, Senior Research Scientist, Intel Research Berkeley

Panelists respond to the keynote and go beyond, exploring physical computing in an urban environment and how multi-sensory media practices change social connections.


Sensors and Sensibilities: Nancy Van House, Professor, School of Information, UC Berkeley
June 2, 2008; yyyy 17 Minutes; Video
Nancy Van House, Professor, School of Information, UC Berkeley

Panelists respond to the keynote and go beyond, exploring physical computing in an urban environment and how multi-sensory media practices change social connections.

Sensors and Sensibilities: Panel
June 2, 2008; yyyy 6 Minutes; Video
Eric Paulos, Senior Research Scientist, Intel Research Berkeley
Na
ncy Van House, Professor, School of Information, UC Berkeley

Panelists respond to the keynote and go beyond, exploring physical computing in an urban environment and how multi-sensory media practices change social connections.

Body Building: Kimiko Ryokai
June 2, 2008; yyyy 22 Minutes; Video
Kimiko Ryokai, Professor, School of Information and Berkeley Center for New Media, UC Berkeley

Panelists explore relationships among the body, digital design, smart wool, architecture, and production.
Body Building: Yehuda Kalay
June 2, 2008; yyyy 20 Minutes; Video
Yehuda Kalay, Professor, Architecture, UC Berkeley

Panelists explore relationships among the body, digital design, smart wool, architecture, and production.
Body Building: Panel
June 2, 2008; yyyy 8 Minutes; Video
Kimiko Ryokai, Professor, School of Information and Berkeley Center for New Media, UC Berkeley
Ye
huda Kalay, Professor, Architecture, UC Berkeley


Panelists explore relationships among the body, digital design, smart wool, architecture, and production.
Performing the Body Electric: Shannon Jackson
June 2, 2008; yyyy 25 Minutes; Video
Shannon Jackson, Professor, Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, UC Berkeley

This panel explores how performance can bridge real and virtual worlds and has the potential to change our sense of place, community, and safe distance.
Performing the Body Electric: Kris Paulsen
June 2, 2008; yyyy 23 Minutes; Video
Kris Paulsen, Graduate Student, Rhetoric, Film Studies, and New Media, UC Berkeley

This panel explores how performance can bridge real and virtual worlds and has the potential to change our sense of place, community, and safe distance.

Black Cloud / Red Eye: Greg Niemeyer
June 2, 2008; yyyy 3 Minutes; Video
Artist Greg Niemeyer recaps and concludes the immersive game Black Cloud / Red Eye.
Beyond Ocularism: Bruce Charlesworth
June 2, 2008; yyyy 24 Minutes; Video
Bruce Charlesworth, Artist

New media artists exhibited at Berkeley Big Bang 08 and 01SJ: A Global Festival of Art on the Edge present their works and discuss the artistic opportunities afforded by engaging the artist’s and viewer’s bodies in the work.
Beyond Ocularism: Lian Sifuentes, Artist
June 2, 2008; yyyy 19 Minutes; Video
Lian Sifuentes, Artist

New media artists exhibited at Berkeley Big Bang 08 and 01SJ: A Global Festival of Art on the Edge present their works and discuss the artistic opportunities afforded by engaging the artist’s and viewer’s bodies in the work.
Beyond Ocularism: Scott Snibbe
June 2, 2008; yyyy 18 Minutes; Video
Scott Snibbe, Artist

New media artists exhibited at Berkeley Big Bang 08 and 01SJ: A Global Festival of Art on the Edge present their works and discuss the artistic opportunities afforded by engaging the artist’s and viewer’s bodies in the work.
Remix: From Science to Art and Back in the Digital Age
June 3, 2008; yyyy 2 Minutes; Video
Introduction by Richard Rinehart, Digital Media Director and Adjunct Curator, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

The second of a two-part symposium, co-hosted by the Berkeley Art Museum and Leonardo: The International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST).

Introduction: Steve Wilson
June 3, 2008; yyyy 20 Minutes; Video
Steve Wilson, Leonardo board member since 1983, speaks about forty years of Leonardo: The International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (ISAST).
“Osmosis”: What Can the Arts Do for the Sciences?: Bronac Ferran
June 3, 2008; yyyy 27 Minutes; Video
Bronac Ferran, Writer, Researcher, Instructor at Royal College of Art in London and Past Director of Interdisciplinary Arts at Arts Council England

Art-Science interaction is a two-way process. The impact of science and technology on the arts is much discussed and well-documented. This panel seeks to examine the influence of the arts on the sciences, and the benefits that science can derive from the arts.
“Osmosis”: What Can the Arts Do for the Sciences?: Melinda Rackham
June 3, 2008; yyyy 20 Minutes; Video
Melinda Rackham, Executive Director of the Australian Network for Art and Technology

Art-Science interaction is a two-way process. The impact of science and technology on the arts is much discussed and well-documented. This panel seeks to examine the influence of the arts on the sciences, and the benefits that science can derive from the arts.
“Osmosis”: What Can the Arts Do for the Sciences?: Jim Crutchfield
June 3, 2008; yyyy 23 Minutes; Video
Jim Crutchfield, Director of Complexity Sciences Center, Professor of Physics at UC Davis, and Co-founder and Scientific Director of the Art and Science Laboratory, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Art-Science interaction is a two-way process. The impact of science and technology on the arts is much discussed and well-documented. This panel seeks to examine the influence of the arts on the sciences, and the benefits that science can derive from the arts.

“Osmosis”: What Can the Arts Do for the Sciences?: Chris Chafe
June 3, 2008; yyyy 16 Minutes; Video
Chris Chafe, Composer, Duca Family Professor and Director of the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University

Art-Science interaction is a two-way process. The impact of science and
technology on the arts is much discussed and well-documented. This panel seeks to examine the influence of the arts on the sciences, and the benefits that science can derive from the arts.

“Osmosis”: What Can the Arts Do for the Sciences?: Panel
June 3, 2008; yyyy 17 Minutes; Video
Bronac Ferran, Writer, Researcher, Instructor at Royal College of Art in London and Past Director of Interdisciplinary Arts at Arts Council England
Melinda Rackham, Executive Director of the Australian Network for Art and Technology
Jim Crutchfield, Director of Complexity Sciences Center, Professor of Physics at UC Davis, and Co-founder and Scientific Director of the Art and Science Laboratory, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Chris Chafe, Composer, Duca Family Professor and Director of the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University

Art-Science interaction is a two-way process. The impact of science and technology on the arts is much discussed and well-documented. This panel seeks to examine the influence of the arts on the sciences, and the benefits that science can derive from the arts.

Brilliant Noise: How Data Becomes Experience for Artists and for Scientists: Introduction, Tami Spector
June 3, 2008; yyyy 4 Minutes; Video
Tami Spector,Professor: Chemistry, USF Department of Chemistry

Most information about the world in which we live is now mediated by instruments. This data is often visualized and sonified, both to aid analysis and to communicate with other researchers, but artists, too, can make this data meaningful and “sensual.” The same data sets can lead to very different kinds of work. One person’s noise is another person’s sound.
Brilliant Noise: How Data Becomes Experience for Artists and for Scientists: Laura Peticolas
June 3, 2008; yyyy 18 Minutes; Video
Laura Peticolas, Geophysical Researcher at the Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley

Most information about the world in which we live is now mediated by instruments. This data is often visualized and sonified, both to aid analysis and to communicate with other researchers, but artists, too, can make this data meaningful and “sensual.” The same data sets can lead to very different kinds of work. One person’s noise is another person’s sound.
Brilliant Noise: How Data Becomes Experience for Artists and for Scientists: Camille Utterback
June 3, 2008; yyyy 18 Minutes; Video
Camille Utterback, Interactive Video Artist, Inventor, and Founder of Creative Nerve

Most information about the world in which we live is now mediated by instruments. This data is often visualized and sonified, both to aid analysis and to communicate with other researchers, but artists, too, can make this data meaningful and “sensual.” The same data sets can lead to very different kinds of work. One person’s noise is another person’s sound.
Brilliant Noise: How Data Becomes Experience for Artists and for Scientists: Panel
June 3, 2008; yyyy 13 Minutes; Video
Laura Peticolas, Geophysical Researcher at the Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley
Douglas Kahn, Auditory and Sound Culture Historian, Founding Director and Professor of Technocultural Studies at UC Davis
Camille Utterback, Interactive Video Artist, Inventor, and Founder of Creative Nerve

Most information about the world in which we live is now mediated by instruments. This data is often visualized and sonified, both to aid analysis and to communicate with other researchers, but artists, too, can make this data meaningful and “sensual.” The same data sets can lead to very different kinds of work. One person’s noise is another person’s sound.
The New Sensuality: Epistemologies of the Very, Very Small: Wayne Lanier
June 3, 2008; yyyy 17 Minutes; Video
Wayne Lanier, Microbiologist at the Hidden Ecologies project of the San Francisco Exploratorium

Human cognition is bounded by the inadequacy of human senses to allow us sensory contact with the world on scales larger or smaller than ourselves. To perceive the nano world, one needs extended senses or new senses. The nano world requires a new ontology and a new epistemology.
The New Sensuality: Epistemologies of the Very, Very Small: Jennifer Frazier
June 3, 2008; yyyy 21 Minutes;
Jennifer Frazier, Project Director of the Visualization Laboratory, San Francisco Exploratorium

Human cognition is bounded by the inadequacy of human senses to allow us sensory contact with the world on scales larger or smaller than ourselves. To perceive the nano world, one needs extended senses or new senses. The nano world requires a new ontology and a new epistemology.